Last edited by Mizahn
Sunday, August 16, 2020 | History

3 edition of evaluation of pleasure in Plato"s ethics. found in the catalog.

evaluation of pleasure in Plato"s ethics.

Jussi Tenkku

evaluation of pleasure in Plato"s ethics.

by Jussi Tenkku

  • 261 Want to read
  • 10 Currently reading

Published by Edidit Societas Philosophica] in [Helsinki .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Plato,
  • Pleasure

  • Edition Notes

    Bibliography: p. 226-231.

    SeriesActa philosophica Fennica -- fasc. 11, 1956
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsB398 P58 T46
    The Physical Object
    Pagination234p.
    Number of Pages234
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL13639764M

      Plato was an ancient Greek philosopher who originated various ideas that strongly influenced Western philosophy, including philosophical thoughts on ethics, particularly virtue ethics. Virtue ethics. Introduction. The Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle's most important study of personal morality and the ends of human life, has for many centuries been a widely-read and influential written more than 2, years ago, it offers the modern reader many valuable insights into human needs and conduct. Among its most outstanding features are Aristotle's insistence that there are no known.

      Originally published in , this book contains the complete text of Plato's Philebus in an English translation. Among the last of the late Socratic dialogues, the central concern of the Philebus is the relative value of knowledge and pleasure. From this basis the text moves towards an understanding of human happiness and the constituent Author: R. Hackworth. Plato's Academy, founded in the s, was the ultimate ancestor of the modern university (hence the English term academic); an influential centre of research and learning, it attracted many men of outstanding ability. The great mathematicians Theaetetus (–) and Eudoxus of Cnidus (–) were associated with it. Although Plato was.

    sense of pleasure, the person is acting in an amoral way. Acts are considered to be nonmoral if moral standards essentially do not apply to the acts; for example, choosing between cereal and toast and jam for breakfast is a nonmoral decision. When people consider matters of ethics, they usually are considering matters. Plato’s moral psychology also links each part of the soul with a corresponding pleasure and object to which it is attracted. The appetitive part is the largest and strongest part because of its intensity of desire for food, drink, and anything associated with pleasure.


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Evaluation of pleasure in Plato"s ethics by Jussi Tenkku Download PDF EPUB FB2

Pleasure in general in Greek ethical thought --The defence of hedonism in the Protagoras --Plato's refutation of hedonism in the Gorgias --The rejection of bodily pleasures in the Phaedo --The evaluation of hedonism in the Republic --The place of pleasure in the good life in the Philebus.

The evaluation of pleasure in Plato's ethics. [Jussi Tenkku] Home. WorldCat Home About WorldCat Help. Search. Search for Library Items Search for Lists Search for Contacts Search for a Library.

Create Book\/a>, schema:CreativeWork\/a> ; \u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\n library. Pleasure, Knowledge, and Being: An Analysis of Plato's Philebus. Cynthia HAMPTON - - State University of New York Press.

The Evaluation of Pleasure in Plato's Ethics. Those engaged in Plato's ethics and the current renaissance of Greco-Roman virtue-ethics will welcome Daniel C. Russell's Plato on Pleasure and the Good Life, professedly the first examination of Plato's treatment of pleasure and its relation to virtue and happiness throughout the corpus in at least fifty Russell notes, Jussi Tenkku's The Evaluation of Pleasure in Plato's Ethics, Acta.

an evaluation of plato s ideal state Download an evaluation of plato s ideal state or read online books in PDF, EPUB, Tuebl, and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to get an evaluation of plato s ideal state book now. This site is like a library, Use search box in.

Replacing Irwin's earlier Plato's Moral Theory (Oxford, ), this book gives a clearer and fuller account of the main questions and discusses some recent controversies in the interpretation of Plato's ethics.

It does not presuppose any knowledge of Greek or any extensive knowledge of Plato. 23 See Tenkku, Jussi, The Evaluation of Pleasure in Plato's Ethics (Acta Philosophica Fennica XI, ), pp.

36 –9; Sullivan, J. P., ‘ The Hedonism in Plato's Protagoras ’, Phronesis 6 (), 10 – 28, especially 19–   An Evaluation of the Relation between Pleasure and Perfect Activity in Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics VII and X”, International Journal of Philosophical Studies, 7(2): – Van Riel, Gerd, a, Pleasure and the Good Life: Plato, Aristotle, and the Neoplatonists, Leiden: Brill, Especially pp.

7–37 on Plato and 43–78 on Aristotle. Ethics, in the sense of a concern to act rightly and to live a good life, is pervasive in Plato's work, and so we find Plato's ethical thinking throughout the the Sophist, whose major theme is the problem of being and not‐being, examines this in the context of discovering what is distinctive about sophistry, which can corrupt our attempt to live well.

This book is an evolution of Plato’s Moral Theory where Irwin presented for the first time his personal interpretation of Plato’s ethics. The aim of this book is to demonstrate that Plato’s rejection of Socrates’ instrumentalism is one of the key elements in the development of Plato’s philosophical perspective.

The book, which is structured in 20 chapters, is a dialogue by dialogue. While Plato considers the only true Good to be the universal form which exists only in the realm of ideas, Aristotle rejects Plato's characterization. Aristotle thinks that the good is the end of human action in general and should therefore have practical ramifications for the way a person should act.

Hence pleasure is a part of the life of virtue, because pleasure is a part of virtuous activity itself. ;Second, I locate Plato's evaluation of pleasure within his moral psychology. Plato's ethical evaluation of pleasure seeks to make pleasure something transformed by virtue. However, in order for pleasure so to be transformed by virtue, it.

The book offers a fresh perspective on how good things bear on happiness in Plato's ethics, and shows that for Plato, pleasure cannot determine happiness because pleasure lacks a direction of its own. Abstract. In the Philebus, Socrates maintains two theses about the relationship between pleasure and the good life: (1) the mixed life of pleasure and intelligence is better than the unmixed life of intelligence, and: (2) the unmixed life of intelligence is the most together, these two claims lead to the paradoxical conclusion that the best human life is better than the life of a god.

Preview. Arenson’s Health and Hedonism offers an arresting comparative study of Plato’s treatments of pleasure in the Republic (ch. 1) and the Philebus (chs. ), the debates that followed among Platonists and Aristotelians (ch.

3), and Epicurean hedonism (ch. She concludes (ch. 8) that Epicurus conceived pleasure in terms of organic functioning. While both authors wrote books centered around other concepts (The Republic by Plato focuses on justice and The Nicomachean Ethics by Aristotle primarily deals with happiness), “the good” underlies the motivations to pursue the questions of their main themes, such as being the reason to seek justice in The Republic, is the center of their.

The first two topics dealt with in Book Ten pleasure and contemplation will be analyzed individually. For an analysis of Aristotle 's closing comments on the necessity of proper laws to help citizens lead virtuous lives, see the analysis of Book Two, which addresses this topic in depth.

A summary of Part X (Section6) in Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of Nicomachean Ethics and what it means.

Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans. Book 2, Chapter 3. Aristotle argues that someone’s pleasure or pain following an action gives an indication of that person’s state.

For example, if someone enjoys abstaining from pleasures, he’s moderate and levelheaded; if he’s grieved by it, he’s overindulgent. Search the world's most comprehensive index of full-text books. My library. Aristotle on Pleasure.

Abstract: Aristotle's ethics is reviewed and his distinction between pleasure and happiness is explained. A summary of Aristotle's ethics clarifies several important distinction between happiness and pleasure. Eudaemonia: the state of personal well being, having.

In the Laws, Plato applies the idea of a fixed, natural law to sex, and takes a much harsher line than he does in the Symposium or the Phraedrus.

In Book One he writes about how opposite-sex sex acts cause pleasure by nature, while same-sex sexuality is “unnatural” (c). The Nicomachean Ethics by Aristotle is the most influential book of the moral Kant to John Rawls, all philosophers have discussed the issue with Aristotle on the good life and on happiness.

To summarize, Aristotle raises the question of virtue: How should we act? How to live? The man, he said, must act according to reason. The moral of Aristotle is an ethics based on .